Tillväxtverket

Integrate cross-cutting issues

All projects within the Demo Environment programme must show on effects on the environment and climate, poverty and gender equality. Here you can read about how to integrate these cross-cutting issues in the planning, implementation and follow-up of your project.

Environment and Climate

All projects within the Demo Environment programme involve technologies that can help solve relevant environmental problems in the project countries. Below you find questions you can use to describe how your project relates to the Demo Environment programme’s five thematic priorities.

For more information and tools, see Sida’s Green Toolbox.external link

Overarching questions

  • What is the environmental and/or climate issue that your project will address?
  • What natural resources is the project dependent on?
  • How the project develop products, services or solutions that are new and innovative in the context, and that reduce stress on the environment?
  • How do you plan to follow up the effects that the project has on the environment, in the short and long term?
  • In what way will the effects of the project be measured?
  • What actors work with environment and climate in the project context and is there an opportunity for exchange of experience and knowledge transfer?

Climate change/adaptation

  • Does your project contribute to strengthened institutional capacity to integrate climate adaptation and climate risks, including resilience to environmental impact and climate change?
  • Does your project contribute to reduced greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution?
  • Does your project contribute to increased adaptation to and resilience to climate change?

Sustainable use and management of eco-system services

  • Does your project contribute to more sustainable use and management of natural resources?

Improved access to sustainable energy

  • Does your project contribute to increased access to cost- and energy-efficient, sustainable and renewable energy alternatives?

Sustainable water and sanitation management

  • Does your project contribute to increased institutional capacity for more cost-effective and sustainable use of water resources?
  • Does your project contribute to strengthened local, national and regional water resource management?
  • Does your project contribute to reduced negative impact on drinking water caused by chemical substances and other types of pollutants?

Sustainable urban development

  • Does your project contribute to increased institutional competence and capacity to design policies and plans for sustainable urban development?
  • Does your project contribute to improved living conditions and increased safety for people living in slum areas?
  • Does your project contribute to improved waste management and recycling?

Poverty

Tillväxtverket makes use of Sida’s conceptual framework for multidimensional poverty. Integrating a multidimensional poverty perspective in your project entails analyzing how the project affects its context through peoples access to the four dimensions (resources, opportunities and choice, power and voice, and human security).

For more information and tools see Sida’s Poverty Toolbox.external link

Resources

Being poor in terms of resources means not having access to or power over resources that can be used to sustain a decent living standard and improve one’s life. Resources can be both material and nonmaterial – e.g. a decent income, capital, being educated or trained, professional skills, being healthy.

Opportunities and choice

Being poor in terms of opportunities and choice concerns what possibility you have to develop and/ or use your resources so as to move out of poverty. Access to e.g. social services, to infrastructure, to capital, to land, or to natural resources affects the opportunities and choices.

Power and voice

Being poor through lack of power and voice relates to the ability of people to articulate their concerns, needs and rights in an informed way, and to take part in decision-making that relate to these concerns. Power is a relational concept that allows us to better understand socio-cultural hierarchies and relations of which gender is one, others include age, caste, class, religion, ethnicity and sexual identity. Reinforcing forms of discrimination based on such socio-cultural relations may increase an individual’s poverty in this sense.

Human security

Being poor in terms of human security implies that violence and insecurity are constraints to different groups’ and individuals’ possibilities to exercise their human rights and to find paths out of poverty.

Diversity and Gender Equality

Having a gender equality perspective in a project involves highlighting the conditions of women and men in project planning and aiming to change any unjustified differences between men and women that are relevant to the project implementation. It also entails following up to see if the project has contributed to furthering gender equality.

Integrating a diversity perspective extends this analysis to how different social groups are affected by the project. Thus, you can include a diversity and gender perspective in your project by describing the conditions of different groups divided by e.g. gender, ethnic origin, religion, belief, disability, age, sexual orientation, transgender identity or expression, and how your project will affect these groups.

For more information and tools see Sida’s Gender Toolbox.external link

Below you find questions you can use to describe how the work for diversity and gender equality is relevant in your project.

Overarching questions

  • Does the project have clear goals related to diversity and gender equality and how do you follow up on it?
  • In what way will the effects of the project be measured?
  • What actors work with diversity and gender equality in the project context and is there an opportunity for exchange of experience and knowledge transfer?

Project organizations competences concerning diversity and gender equality

  • Do the project organization have a plan or strategy concerning diversity and gender equality?
  • What skills and experiences are needed in the context and in your project?
  • Which persons or groups are part of the project? How should the project bring in participants with different backgrounds, who can contribute with new approaches?

What sectors in the project country will be affected by the project?

  • Which groups of people work in these sectors?
  • Which groups do not work in these sectors, and why?
  • Who owns the resources in these sectors?

What target groups does the project have?

  • Can you broaden your target group and reach more people of different gender and backgrounds?
  • What risks does excluding certain groups or perspectives entail?
  • Can you adapt your language and/or communication channels to reach new groups?
  • How could the project's results contribute to increased accessibility for people with disabilities?